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Hyperglycemia

Longitudinal studies in which neonatal/infant animals were given doses of glutamic acid (GLU) and then observed over a period of time before being sacrificed for brain examination, repeatedly found abnormal development, behavioral aberrations, and neuroendocrine disorders.

In 1971, Lynch, while working for the FDA, reported hyperglycemia along with growth suppression. He noted that hyperglycemia did not occur when subjects were given intact protein containing a large amount of monosodium glutamate.(1)

In 2000, Macho, Fickova, and Jezova found that early postnatal administration of MSG exerts an important effect on glucose metabolism and insulin action in adipocytes of adult animals (Macho L, Fickova M, Jezova, Zorad S. Late effects of postnatal administration of monosodium glutamate on insulin action in adult rats. Physiol Res 2000;49 Suppl 1:S79-85)
 

REFERENCE

1. Lynch, J.F., Jr., Lewis, L.M., and Adkins, J.S. (Division of Nutrition, FDA, Washington, D.C. 20204). Monosodium glutamate-induced hyperglycemia in weanling rats. J S Fed Proc 31: 1477, 1971.
 

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IF MSG ISN'T HARMFUL, WHY IS IT HIDDEN?